Heresy in Missouri?

Pr. Gene Brueggemann Heresy is a teaching which has the venom of the Serpent in it to poison the wellspring of the church’s teaching and life: the gospel of God’s gracious redemption of humankind revealed most clearly and convincingly in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth, the Word made flesh. Luther and…
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Lutheran Zionism

Why Seminex – Lutheran Zionism Editor: The divisions within the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod (LCMS) predated The New Orleans Convention and the events leading up to Seminex. Eugene Brueggemann, digs deeply into the history of the church body, naming names, delineating theology, pointing out the politics, and expresses his love, admiration, and dismay to what…
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Luther’s Doctrine of the Two Kingdoms in Today’s World

By Eugene Brueggemann           All of us have a stake in the interface between religion and politics. Some of us support the agenda of the religious right, which stands for traditional values like opposition to homosexual behavior, for love of country and opposition to the slippery slope of secularism. Others of us emphasize equally biblical…
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Remembering Wayne Saffen

By Eugene Brueggemann Wayne Saffen is one of those unsung heroes in a lost cause whose contribution to that cause was worthy of note. The lost cause was defending the Missouri Synod and its St. Louis seminary from the swarm of cultural and theological conservatives who triumphed at the Denver convention in 1973. He was…
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The Impossible Dream: LCMS Fellowship with Other Lutherans

By Eugene Brueggemann The question of church fellowship is one of the leitmotifs in the history of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod. The fellowship debate serves as a perennial tar baby in our fellowship, an obsession which time and again distracts us from other more pressing questions of mission and ministry. The sad, offensive spectacle we…
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The Experiment That Failed

By Eugene Brueggemann One of the most important speeches I ever heard was delivered at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, on the occasion of my graduation from grad school in 1951 –and I thought it was a terrible speech. The speaker was Dr. A.H. Grumm, a Vice-President of Synod. He had three books at the podium as…
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